The Chemical Atlas

Minisession: Quicksilver

Quicksilver, on tour with Witchhammer, accepted a run / concert contract on a hidden compound near the borer of the Athabasca-Manitoo Council from Rose Has-No-Horse, who had figured out the headquarters of the Pure Blackfoot cult and wanted them wiped out.

poster.jpg
Concert poster courtesy of Robin Eng

To avoid Sioux military patrols actively looking for them, The band took advantage of Quicksilver’s intimate knowledge of smuggling routes through the border of the AMC and the Athabasca Coucil. Only-She-Whispers summoned a powerful spirit of Earth, who called itself Sleeps-Deep-In-Sand, and bargained with it to help dig a massive tunnel through which they could fly their VTOL Thunderbird, the Iron Lady of Mercy.

In exchange, Witchhammer and Quicksilver asked fans to bring obsidian stolen from museums so long as they were not native american heritage artifacts. This greatly pleased Sleeps-Deep-In-Sand, who had many altars constructed in his image at the concert.

To ensure they would be safe from the Sioux military once they arrived in the AMC, despite it being outside their borders, Quicksilver made a potentially dangerous deal with the rogue AI, Master Shredder, to negotiate temporary extraterratoriality for the concert site through TicketBastard. In exchange, he, and Witchhammer, agreed to give it all merchandising rights to the concert.

Once there, and once the band had whipped the crowd into an appropriate frenzy, they effectively allowed their fans to soften up the first waves of the cult guards in a vicious mosh pit fueled by Inquisitor’s mood-affecting magics, after which they entered the hidden compound effortlessly.

Once inside, they confronted a strange being named Crippled Wolf composed of swarming metallic parts in humanoid shape in a hoodie. During the confrontation, a spirit of man summoned by Only-She-Whispers delivered a message to Quicksilver from a powerful spirit who had taken offense to Crippled Wolf’s efforts to violently purge the Blackfoot tribe. The spirit revealed itself to be the very same spirit Quicksilver once, in a moment of courtesy rare amongst magicians, simply told the spirit it was free to do whatever it wanted. One wonders what it’s been up to during that time, and it certainly seemed to have become stronger…

Quicksilver began to play Let There Be Rock directly into the spirit world, as something in his eyes reacted to his music and burst forth. As his power ballad reached deeper and deeper into the metaplanes, Witchhammer did their best to fend off Crippled Wolf. Organ Grinder made use all the demonic contracts at his disposal to first disarm him of his insect swarm, revealing a strange skeleton underneath, and then wrench out Crippled Wolf’s soul and send it to Hell.

Something went wrong, however, and Crippled Wolf did not react as expected. A vortex directly to Hell opened beneath him, which began to pull everything, and everyone, in.

The music of Quicksilver reached out deep enough to create a bridge to the metaplanes, which the man-spirit called the Rainbow Bridge, and over it came a powerful, ancient spirit that pulsed with primal energies. This spirit pulled them all back from the vortex and closed it.

It spoke only briefly, but the band learned they were in the presence of Blood Clot, the spirit of Blackfoot legend that helped the tribe learn to survive in the beginning of days. It thanked them for their service to the tribe of his favour before departing over the withdrawing energies of the dissipating Rainbow Bridge.

Venturing just a little deeper into the little bunker revealed a lab in which a single figure floated in a tank, the original meat of Crippled Wolf, whose brain had been neatly and surgically removed. It was clearly a very old clone of the same series as Click.

Something essential changed in Quicksilver as a result, and he is now able to differentiate between clone subjects of Project Wishing Star and the natural-born on sight.

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